Welcome to Allergy Allies...

Welcome to Allergy Allies!
Inspired by our own experiences of food allergy and of others we have met along the way, I wanted to create a safe space where people can access information all in one place, learn about other’s experiences and to find resources to re-educate those people in our lives who may not understand the situation, adding to the challenges we face. The website is still evolving but I hope we have started to do this and I really look forward to hearing your feedback!
Helen x

Note: Our food resources focus on the 8 most common children’s allergens, which are; Milk, Eggs, Peanuts, Soya, Wheat, Tree Nuts, Fish and Shellfish. However, the website is aimed at all children’s food allergies and everyone’s experience is welcome.

FACTS & FIGURES

Source: Allergy UK

UK Allergy Prevalence - 20%

The UK has some of the highest prevalence rates of allergic conditions in the world, with over 20% of the population affected by one or more allergic disorder. (M. L. Levy, 2004)

Food allergy affects 3-6% of children in the developed world

Food allergy affects 3-6% of children in the developed world (3). In the UK, it is estimated that the prevalence for food allergy is 7.1% in breast-fed infants, with 1 in 40 developing peanut allergy and 1 in 20 developing egg allergy (BSACI, 2011).

Incidence of food allergy (often life threatening) is estimated to be greater in toddlers (5-8%)

Food allergies are a cause of particular concern in young children, where the incidence of food allergy (often life threatening) is estimated to be greater in toddlers (5-8%) than in adults (1-2%) (Pawankar R, et al, 2013).

The prevalence of CMA (Cows Milk Allergy) in children living in the developed world is approximately 2% to 3%,

The prevalence of CMA (Cows Milk Allergy) in children living in the developed world is approximately 2% to 3%, making it the most common cause of food allergy in the paediatric population. Only among breastfed infants is the prevalence lower (0.5 %). These numbers most likely refer to IgE mediated CMA, while the prevalence of non-IgE-mediated CMA is not well known (Lifschitz C, 2015).

UK Allergy Prevalence 20%

20%

Food allergy affects 3-6% of children in the developed world

6% Complete

Incidence of food allergy is estimated to be greater in toddlers (5-8%)

8%

The prevalence of CMA (Cows Milk Allergy) in children living in the developed world is approximately 2% to 3%

3%

RESEARCH / SURVEY FACTS

Source: Allergy UK

20%

Percentage of patients with allergies struggle daily with the fear of a possible asthma attack, anaphylactic shock, or even death from an allergic reaction

11 - 26 Million

Around 11-26 million members of the European population are estimated to suffer from food allergy. If this prevalence is projected onto the world’s population of 7 billion, it translates into 240-550 million potential food-allergic people; a huge global health burden (Pawankar R, et al, 2013).

10 - 19%

In regards to severe allergic reactions, cow’s milk comprises 10% to 19% of food-induced anaphylaxis cases seen both in the field and in emergency departments in paediatric and mixed age populations. It is the third most common food product to cause anaphylaxis, following peanut and tree nuts (Kattan, 2011)

10 Years

The prevalence of peanut allergy among children in Western countries has doubled in the past 10 years. (Du Toit, 2015)

THE FORUM

Check out the latest forum posts. Share your experiences and tips with others in a similar situation to you!

Testimonials

Think food allergies aren’t serious? Think again…

Fact: This is more than just an itch or a stomachache. Food allergies can cause symptoms from hives and a stuffy nose, to vomiting, difficulty breathing and loss of consciousness. If an allergic reaction is severe or involves several parts of the body, it becomes anaphylaxis and can be life-threatening.

Food allergies are not only potentially life-threatening, they’re life-altering. People with food allergies must always be vigilant to ensure they avoid reactions. 

Food allergies—and the people who live with them—should always be taken seriously. (Source:  Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE))

QUICK LINKS

Check out some links to pages we think you should look at!